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Essentials
 
 

Essentials

Discover the essential sites you simply must see during your stay in Metz!

Saint-Etienne cathedral

Saint-Etienne cathedral

Saint-Etienne cathedral, with its nave 42 m high, is one of the tallest Gothic buildings in Europe, and its 6500 m² of stained glass windows (from the 13th to the 20th century including some by Chagall) earned it the nickname of “The Good Lord's Lantern”.

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Saint-Etienne cathedral

Built from the 13th to the 16th century, it was created by bringing together the Bishop's church, the cathedral, and the canons' church, Notre-Dame-la-Ronde, which explains its unusual plan.

The Centre Pompidou-Metz

Centre Pompidou-Metz
Centre Pompidou-Metz

Designed as a unique experience and a place for discovering contemporary creativity in all its forms, the Centre Pompidou-Metz is a communal space where events are hosted all year round, in an impressive building created by Shigeru Ban and Jean de Gastines, in collaboration with Philip Gumuchdjian Architects for the design of the award-winning project.

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The Cour d'Or Museum

The Cour d'Or Museum

Named after the palace of the kings of Austrasia, this museum houses an outstanding archaeology section, a beautiful medieval architecture section, an extensive fine arts section and a space dedicated to the history of the Jewish community Metz.

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The Cour d'Or Museum

Gallo-Roman and medieval collections: ancient thermal baths, Merten's column, chancel of Saint-Pierre-aux-Nonnains, medieval painted ceilings...

The opera-theatre

The opera-theatreThis is the oldest working opera-theatre in France. Built between 1738 and 1752, its architecture is typical of the 18th century. The statues, depicting the muses and placed along the balustrade, were made by the local sculptor Charles Pêtre in 1858.

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The Templars' Chapel

The Templars' ChapelBuilt between 1180 and 1220, this chapel is an example of the transition between Romanesque and Gothic art. It is also the only example of an octagonal chapel in Lorraine. It is now part of the Arsenal cultural complex.

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The Arsenal

The ArsenalThe Arsenal, completed under Napoleon III in 1864, was fully restored and transformed by the Catalan architect Ricardo Bofill in 1989. The Great Hall is known for its exceptional acoustics. The Arsenal is a place of expression for all cultures, meetings and exchanges.

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Saint-Pierre-aux-Nonnains church

St Pierre aux Nonnains ChurchOne of the oldest monuments in Metz, an architectural reminder of 2000 years of history. Today, Saint-Pierre-aux-Nonnains is part of the Arsenal cultural complex and offers a magnificent setting for concerts, conferences and exhibitions.

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The station

The stationThe centrepiece of the Nouvelle Ville was built in accordance with the wishes of Kaiser Wilhelm II in the early 20th century. Its dimensions were intended to allow easy transportation of goods and civilians, and facilitate the movement of troops, equipment and animals in a record time of 24 hours. All the cutting-edge techniques of the time were used in its making.

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Avenue Foch

Avenue FochThis avenue is a striking example of the eclectic styles and materials chosen by the architects at the beginning of the 20th century in Metz. The city was regarded as a real laboratory of architecture at the time. The result is an urban landscape which is unique in France and Europe.

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The Temple Neuf

The Temple NeufIts architecture is inspired by the Rhenish cathedrals of Speyer and Worms, which gives it a medieval look although it was built in the early 20th century. This temple was designed for the civil community and remains a place of worship. It is also used to host cultural events.

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Place Saint-Louis

Place Saint LouisA reminder of Metz's medieval prosperity, it was first named “Place du Change” and then renamed “Place Saint-Louis”. The square retains its picturesque, Italian-inspired architecture to this day.

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Saint-Maximin church

Saint Maximin ChurchSaint-Maximin church (12th-15th centuries) still has the stained glass windows made by Jean Cocteau in the 1960's.

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The Porte des Allemands

The Porte des AllemandsThe “German door” is named after the Teutonic knights or Hospitaller brothers, who had a hospital nearby. It is the most imposing remaining part of the medieval ramparts (13th-16th centuries) and is currently undergoing restoration.

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The Récollets Cloister

The Récollets CloisterThis group of buildings is remarkable for its elegance and simplicity, a little haven of peace and serenity at the heart of the city. It is named after the Récollets Community, which stayed there from 1603 to the Revolution. In 1972, Jean-Marie Pelt founded the European Institute of Ecology there. Since 2002, the Municipal Archives have also been based there.

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The marina

The marinaMetz Marina and Boating Centre have both been awarded the European Blue Flag eco-label, and are located at the heart of the city.

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Parks and gardens

The EsplanadeMetz has more than 580 acres of parkland, nearly 45 m² per capita. It is therefore one of the greenest cities in France. It is a real pleasure to walk through the many parks and gardens dotted about the city (Esplanade, lake, Seille Park...).
 

Video panorama of the city of Metz

Panorama de la ville




 

How do I get to Metz?

Comment venir à Metz ?

Contact

Office de Tourisme de Metz
2, Place d'Armes - CS 80367
F-57007 Metz Cedex 1
FRANCE
+33 (0)3 87 39 00 00
+33 (0)3 87 36 59 43
contact@tourisme-metz.com

Open to the public

April to September and during the Christmas markets:
Mon. to Sat. from 9 am to 7 pm
Sun. and bank holidays from 10 am to 4 pm

October to March:
Mon. to Sat. from 10 am to 6 pm
Sun. and bank holidays from 11 am to 3 pm

Closed on Dec. 25th and Jan. 1st
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